Monday, January 16, 2017

Saturday, January 7, 2017

RIP Huston Smith, The Man Of Religions

The recent passing of a "religious rock star" leaves us still searching for what comes next. In this delightful video below learn what Huston Smith has to say about aging and the afterlife, or as he says "when my body drops." In the interview he sings his favorite hymn! If you want to learn more of his musings about the afterlife, read his Harvard Divinity School's Ingersoll lecture called Intimations of Immortality. In addition to read his obituary in the New York times click here.



 From the Huffington Post: A year that brought the passing of too many important public figures capped it off with the death of the past century’s leading explainer of religion and the roles it plays in people’s lives. Huston Smith died peacefully in his Berkeley California home, at age 97, on December 30th, after a long, steady weakening that had those who knew him scratching their heads about how he lingered so long and remained so lucid. He was beloved for his wit, his decency and the joy he derived from good company and stimulating conversation, and he was revered for his unparalleled contributions to the study of the world’s religions.

Born in 1919 in China and raised there by missionary parents, Smith came home to America at 17 and pursued his studies in religion and philosophy. Always a self-identified Methodist, he was an indomitable explorer long before spiritual eclecticism became fashionable, and his investigation was never the kind of shallow pursuit he advised against, comparing religious dilettantes to people at a buffet who get too much of what they want and not enough of what they need. He plunged deeply into traditions other than his own, not just as a scholar but as a seeker of spiritual illumination. He practiced Zen meditation; he practiced disciplines from the Sufi branch of Islam; he practiced yoga, famously bending and stretching his tall, lean body to demonstrate asanas (postures) in a 1950s film that launched his public career and again, in 1996, on Bill Moyers’ five-part PBS series, “The Wisdom of Faith with Huston Smith.” By then, he was, as the Christian Science Monitor put it, “Religion’s Rock Star.”

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